Bath’s Living Heart, Soft Parking Zones, and Freight Consolidation using Public Transport

Images taken from a presentation I did last night at RIBA’s LIVEABLE CITIES – FESTIVAL OF THE FUTURE CITY, BATH 2017. Enjoy! Continue reading Bath’s Living Heart, Soft Parking Zones, and Freight Consolidation using Public Transport

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Isochrons and Potential Modal Shift

This one is going to get very technical, but stay with me. I think the way we have been deciding where to build cycle infrastructure is fundamentally flawed. My day job is as a software engineer with a smattering of data science. I also play around at hackathons and winning a few.

At the weekend I won one in Bristol with this analysis

Screen Shot 2017-10-14 at 18.22.41.png Given a ward, how many people living in the ward drive to work in the ward? How many people living 5km or less away drive to work in the ward and from what direction?

So what does this tell us?

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A good segregated cycle route from Headley Park and Hengrove to Brislington would have a huge impact.

Screen Shot 2017-10-19 at 23.11.26 Avonmouth probably could do with some really good infrastructure.

Huh? But nobody wants that?

BaNES once asked Sustrans to identify a series of routes in various areas. They asked people. I mean why? What do you gain by asking people? You get people that already cycle affirming certain routes. Anybody already in a car doesn’t really care anyway.

So what should Councils be doing?

Isochrons are the measurement of something as a unit of time. In terms of cycling, 5km is about 20 minutes of cycling and we really don’t care about people already cycling. Yes the infrastructure could all be vastly improved, but let’s ask a simpler question.

Time is money, and congestion costs time

Given that congestion is estimated to cost Bristol £43.7 million a year can we use 20 minutes of travel time to determine the maximum Potential Modal Shift (PMS) for road networks and choose to develop infrastructure to maximise reduction in congestion?

Yes we can!

The work at MSOA level (ward) that I have done indicates that an LSOA (smaller than a ward) commuter flow exclusively using travel to work by car and limiting it to 20 minutes travel by bike applied using route finding, should enable identification of key routes with high PMS. This analysis should define the investment we need to do.

Implication

This method unfortunately absolutely shafts rural investment. Neither does it take into account the school run. However neither does it preclude using school travel plans to add the data into the mix.

Focusing on the problem

Let’s be honest, we could keep on spending money on cycle infra for the next 50 years and still not catch up with the Netherlands, however if we actually want to maximise the shift away from cars to bikes, then let’s identify the maximum PMS by focusing on the actual problem. The private car and the cost of congestion.

Why we need all professional drivers to pass Bikeability Level 3 training

This morning I was walking along Chaucer Road towards Beechen Cliff and observed a mini-bus driver overtake a Beechen Cliff Pupil riding his bike to school. Chaucer Road is a typical Bath residential road with cars parked either side and about 3m of width between. The driver chose to pass the kid at less than 0.5m.

I lost my cool. Stopped the driver, told him in no uncertain terms that that was a dangerous close pass and then called up his company to lodge a complaint.

I later had a call back from the company, where the manager initially apologised and then started to go into a story about how a cyclist up at the top of Wellsway didn’t ride properly across a roundabout. An 11 year old boy was placed in a phenomenally dangerous situation because a professional driver could not wait 10 seconds and his manager tries to use collective responsibility and blame “cyclists”.

W T F?

He did say he would have words with him.

This is where it gets interesting

I suggested that a better solution would be to ensure he gets Bikeability Level 3 training from the council so he understands how bad what he did was. The manager stated that he couldn’t ‘punish’ him that much as bus drivers are quite rare and he would leave to work for somebody else.

All professional drivers must have Bikeability training

The reality is, within a gig economy, we must ensure that the companies that hire these drivers take responsibility for their behaviour. Requiring companies to only be able to hire drivers that have had Bikeability Level 3 training would be a simple step in ensuring the safety of people choosing to cycle to school or work or the shops or just for fun.

I think, particularly taxi and bus companies need to ensure all their drivers have Bikeability training.

Bad driving should require a Bikeability Refresher Course

Let’s be real, there are economic and time pressures on drivers to deliver goods/people as quick as possible. Having to wait for an annoying cyclist can cost them money. However they should realise that the company they work for will put them on Bikeability Training if complaints are received about their driving around vulnerable road users. Evidence of the training should be published.

Driving is what they do

Professional drivers spend their lives on the road and should be held to a high standard. Ideally I’d like to see Bikeability Training as part of passing your driving test, but with a significant number of KSIs related to HGVs, maybe, just maybe, getting those drivers that spend all day on the road trained up as cyclists, we will save lives.

One more thing…

The school drop off at Beechen Cliff has to be seen to be believed and the reality is that closing Chaucer Road at Kipling Avenue to vehicular traffic using bollards would create a quieter, safer residential area and control the speeding traffic that piles along Chaucer on a regular basis. Each resident would still have 3 exits onto Wellsway. A modal filter cell here would have huge benefits to the community and to the safety of children.

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Day commuters and the school run are the real problems in Bath

I have sent this letter to the Bath Chronicle in response to the council’s “Our plan to get Bath moving” . It’s a bit long so unsure if they will print it. The key problems within Bath come down to two ‘actors’.

Day Commuters

28,000 people drive by car and park somewhere in the city. We currently provide 7,000 car parking spaces and most Park and Rides are only a 3rd full by 9am. Day commuters use free parking available on Bath’s residential roads.

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You need to remove the ‘free’ bit through the use of parking control in the form of ‘soft’ Resident Parking Zones across the whole of Bath. This ensures all Park and Ride sites are fully utilised and justifies expansion, and yes, an East Park and Ride solution will be needed, say a Link and Ride using existing brownfield sites.

 

The School Run

Transport for London brought out an interesting statistic. 50% of traffic is the School Run.

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The Council has absolutely no handle on this figure for Bath or even other towns. Priority number one for Highways should be the development of good walking and cycling routes to schools. We need to kill the school run and we need to kill it fast.

Obesity, not Air Pollution is the problem

Let’s be clear, if you focus on Air Pollution, you end up throwing money at Electric Vehicles that still suffer from brake and tyre pollution, but more importantly take up the same space as an internal combustion vehicle.

Air pollution kills 40,000 people a year, Obesity kills 84,000. 88 people each year in BaNES die from Obesity related diseases below the age of 75.

We’re currently at 27.5% obesity, whereas a country that has focused on “Stop de Kindermoord” now has a envious 10% obesity rating. Extrapolating this, 63% of obesity is down to our transport systems. 55 BaNES residents die because of the political decisions your councillors and highways officers make each year.

If we truly want to tackle the health crisis in our transport systems, we need to focus on creating healthy streets and we start with children. We tackle Air Pollution and Obesity through this approach.

We need our own “Stop the child murder”.

We need councillors and councils delivering safe routes to school that enable kids to be able to safely cycle to school. The evidence is though that our council simply does not get the need for this as shown by the up and coming Weston route.

The Letter

Continue reading Day commuters and the school run are the real problems in Bath

The role of children in designing good cycle networks

Children cycling on a city’s roads and paths are the canary in the coal mine. Without overthinking this too much, a parent won’t let a child out to play on a bike unless that parent can perceive that the child can make mistakes and not be run over.

And this gets to the premise that Cycle Bath campaigns on:

To enable everyone to cycle in comfort we need high quality space for cycling, inclusive for all ages and abilities, connecting communities with schools and centres of employment. Routes must be direct and cohesive, with space on main roads re-allocated from the general carriageway, not the footway.

So when Peter Walker writes in the Guardian:

In countries where decades of investment in bike routes has made cycling safer and more everyday, the reverse is true. Almost 40% of Dutch children go to and from school by bike.

We need to understand how you achieve that level of cycling and for that we can look at Public Highways England IAN 195

minimum

Continue reading The role of children in designing good cycle networks

CWIS and not getting a fair crack of the LCWIP

Something profound has happened to the way councils will be able to access money for walking and cycling. Chief Executives of Councils, Councillors, City Mayors, and Metro-Mayors really need to get a handle on this fast because they are about to lose out massively in ways that will only become apparent about a year from now.

The Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy (CWIS) published April 21st 2017, has within it a requirement for councils to prepare Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plans (LCWIPs). Without these in place, councils and regional areas will have no ability to bid for any central government pots of money to improve cycling and walking networks.

Continue reading CWIS and not getting a fair crack of the LCWIP

Stands up for cyclists.

Get your free Sheffield cycle stands here!

BATH NEWSEUM

Well, B&NES cannot replace even the missing cycle stands outside the Guildhall but there’s more independent help for cyclists in  a new initiative which – ironically – is funded by the Council.

Cycling charity Life Cycle UK is offering community groups and small businesses in BANES the chance to apply for FREE cycle stands, thanks to funding from BANES Council.

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The charity thinks installing stands will:
“Encourage employees and visitors to travel the healthy way by giving them safe cycle parking.
Increase customer footfall whilst helping to reduce road congestion and pollution.
Landlords can avoid bike-related wear-and-tear by installing the stands outside their properties.
Sheffield stands are sturdy and secure, minimising the risk of tampering and theft.”

Take A Stand® helps organisations with limited resources to install safe cycle parking at their premises. The stands are provided and delivered completely FREE of charge – all you have to do is…

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The problematic philosophy of ‘shared use’ footways

“‘Shared use’ isn’t future-proof.” I think this problem is one that also pervades our the design approaches that architects use. There is an immense amount of shared space going in to some of these new developments and are based on the premise of cycling just being non-issue rather than a key solution to urban transport as is being demonstrated by London, Cambridge and many other UK cities.

As Easy As Riding A Bike

An old post from Joe Dunkley that resurfaced yesterday in the wake of some comments about Christopher Chope – a former transport minister in the Thatcher government and helmet law enthusiast – has prompted me to reflect on some of the intrinsic problems with ‘shared use’ footways.

The history of ‘shared use’ is itself rather murky, as that post from Joe Dunckley explains.

I understand the “cycle tracks” — that is, crappy shared pavements — that [the Thatcher government] introduced in the 1980 Highways Act were not intended to encourage and enable cycling, but to improve road safety by getting cyclists out of harm’s way while the poor things saved up to buy a car of their own.

This is a good explanation of the background assumption behind the Act – namely, an assumption that cycling was an insignificant mode of transport, one that would either remain insignificant, or…

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Removing separation between walking and cycling does not reduce conflict

I’ve been in a working group looking at the new Bath Quays Bridge (a major new transport corridor for Bath), where architects stated, without any hint of irony, that they are designing in shared space so they can use pedestrians to slow down the cyclists. Our group was shocked that this approach to designing public space was acceptable and considered ‘clever’ and reasonable. This idea that you can ‘control’ cyclists by throwing pedestrians at them really needs to die. It creates so many issues.

As Easy As Riding A Bike

The Royal Parks agency in London has a bit of an issue with cycling. The actions it takes – whether it’s adding cobbled speed humps to popular cycling routes in Hyde Park, or attempting to remove a popular cycle route from that same park, or chasing after a cycle taxi service – give the impression of an organisation that views cycling as something a bit… undesirable. For the Royal Parks, cycling is a problem to be managed, rather than an opportunity, and it appears to be actively trying to discourage it.

What’s even more unfortunate is that the policies the Royal Parks are implementing to manage this ‘problem’ are actually making the Parks worse for everyone, whether they are cycling or not.

A sensible strategy for managing cycling on the existing routes in Hyde Park would be to separate walking and cycling from each other, and to give…

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A better Advanced Stop Line

Over the weekend I made a rather ironic meme:

Blindspotand then tweeted it out:

It did result in a serious discussion and after a lot of thought I redesigned the markings for an ASL using the new deeper ASL standard to give better visual clues to cyclists, but also worked on a set of demands that would significantly improve junction safety.

Continue reading A better Advanced Stop Line

Working, Living, Cycling, and campaigning for better cycle infrastructure in Bath, UK